Peru, Week Four

This was probably the quietest week of my whole trip so far – partly by design – but I did include a video for you at the end.

As far as “work” goes, we switched to afternoons, but that didn’t mean we had any more to do. On Monday, I was alone in the office for most of the afternoon. Sankiyo (the colleague I’ve been paired with) didn’t come in at all, so I eventually left at 6:30pm having done nothing more than browse the internet.

On Tuesday, Jessenia took me and Sankiyo out for lunch – me, for helping her daughter with her English studies last week, and Sankiyo because he turned 40 over the weekend. We went to a chicharroneria because I said I liked chicharrón in Pisac last week.

Afterwards we went to a small local shop (run by an Arariwa client) and sat down to drink a beer. Four beers later, we headed home and that was my day’s “work”.

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With Sankiyo and Jessenia

On Wednesday I met up with Sankiyo at 2:30pm and we travelled to Urcos. We arrived at 4:20pm (for what he assured me would be an hour-long meeting – which would allow him to attend his 7pm English class), but as it turned out, we didn’t finish until about 7:30pm and I finally got home at 9:30pm. The meeting itself was a “closure”, which meant that the group were making their final payments for the loan cycle, as well as doing all the admin for the next cycle. It was quite interesting to observe but I was nothing more than a spectator.

On Thursday I visited another project, at a Young Mothers’ Centre, or Hogar (home), where Emmanuelle was volunteering.

There are ten mothers in the early/mid-teens living there with their babies. The volunteers help out wherever they can, mainly looking after the babies while the girls do other things like go to school, learn skills or just have some time for themselves. It was an eye-opener, even without knowing the stories of the individual girls.

Although I only went to pay the centre a visit, I ended up staying for a couple of hours. 

On Friday, we had planned to go back to Chinchero to make another cocina (stove), but when that was cancelled I decided to go back to the Hogar. I was there from 9am until 2pm, at which point we all had pizza because it was the last day for all three of the other volunteers.

Aside from “work”, I had two more Spanish lessons during the week – I feel like I’ve been given a lot of the tools now, it’s just a case of putting the time in to study and practice.

I had two free mornings where I’d planned to go running, but we had no water in the house so I didn’t.

On Saturday morning I went to the city centre to watch the girls from the Hogar in a parade. There seems to be one every weekend and the effort that goes into them is really impressive, particularly with the outfits.  

I had an early start on Sunday as I went out to watch sunrise above the city. It clouded over while I was waiting for the 5:20am sunrise, but I still managed to get these pictures:
In the afternoon I went to watch Cusco’s main football team, Cienciano, after seeing the game advertised here:

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Even though they’re in the second division at the moment and Real Garcilaso are in the top division, Ciencano are still the most popular side. They’re the oldest team in the country (founded as the science department of the university, hence the name, in 1901) and have won two South American trophies.

Estadio Inca Garcilaso de la Vega

The game itself was very one-sided and the away side just coming to defend – sometimes this makes for a boring spectacle but Union Huaral weren’t very good at it and Cienciano scored twice early. They could/should have scored several more goals before they finally got a third near the end – I got it on video!

In addition to the game, there were some other notable things:

We sat near the back of the west stand in front of these guys, most of whom were reporting on the match all the way through – check out the old school phone in the top right

www.soschildrensvillages.org.uk

There was a collection for a charity that I support and that Manchester City captain Vincent Kompany is a patron of: SOS Children’s Villages http://www.soschildrensvillages.org.uk

I couldn’t resist buying meat and potato on a stick from the food sellers in the stands

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2 thoughts on “Peru, Week Four

  1. Purple Dragon

    Thanks for your updates – I love reading and looking at the pictures. It sounds like the FP isn’t setup for Volunteers very well yet, which is a bit disappointing. It sounds like you’re having a great time though 🙂

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    Reply

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