Tag Archives: Chinchero

Peru, Week Five

I went back to the Hogar on Monday because I knew that there weren’t going to be any other volunteers and they need all the help they can get. In the afternoon, I went to the Arariwa office, but like last Monday, there was basically nobody there.

Tuesday followed a similar pattern to Monday, but after work I stayed in the city to watch Peru play Chile. They’re pretty fanatical here (the previous week’s 2-2 draw vs Argentina was celebrated like a trophy) and almost all restaurants and bars had the game on – either on TV or radio. They scored a late equaliser, but still went on to lose; something they are a bit too used to. 

On Wednesday I joined Sankiyo on a long trip to a village near Urcos. We set off at 2pm by bus and then travelled the last couple of miles by motorbike. I thought he was joking when he first told me, but he borrowed it from a friend when we got to Urcos. 

The meeting followed a similar pattern to one from the previous week and dragged on even longer, so we didn’t get home until 9pm. A seven hour round trip for little reward.  

I didn’t even venture out of the house on Thursday, for two main reasons. First was because of the cold I almost certainly picked up from the kids at the Hogar; second was the weather, which has taken a turn for the worse recently:​

​​On Friday Paula and I returned to the rural village near Chinchero to make another cocina. We helped make the first one a fortnight ago, but this time it was all us! All things considered I think we can be pretty pleased with our efforts!

Saturday was a big day for Arariwa as it was their Día de Confraternizacion de la Familia Arariwa (the annual staff party). I joined them at 8:30am, after meeting up with our Spanish school at 6:30am to visit a local market (it’s only on until 8am on Saturdays). 

The staff party meant that all of Arariwa’s different offices come together for a day of fun, involving sports, food, drink and dancing. Most people brought their families and we were lucky to get some beautiful weather for the occasion. 

It was an amazing setting and we started with each office parading around while everyone else applauded. Different offices went to different amounts of effort, but one person actually dressed up as the Arariwa pig:
The main focus of the morning was the sports – football and volleyball in particular – and this was the venue:

The football was tricky for a few reasons: the pitch was very small for 6-a-side; I didn’t know the rules from the start (can only score from in the final third, can’t throw to people in certain positions etc); and my team wasn’t very good (age and temperament were against us). 

Nonetheless, our match started well enough. I set up a goal that was disallowed (and I still don’t know why) and then scored one of my own, so it was 1-0 at half-time. At this point we changed goalkeepers to accommodate Sankiyo’s late arrival and he took the blame for what happened in the second half, (which I thought was very unfair). 

A combination of fatigue and a couple of decisions going against us led to two of our players losing their heads (one was booked for retaliation) and basically giving up, so we finished as frustrated 4-1 losers. 

I was immediately called on to the volleyball court to join the girls. It seems to be a really popular sport here and I wasn’t really up to speed with all the positions and tactics, but that didn’t stop me from becoming a crowd favourite after a fun couple of minutes. 

It started with me chasing a high ball on to the adjacent football pitch to keep it alive (I ran through both crowds and about 10m on to the pitch). We won the point and everyone seemed to enjoy my enthusiasm. The next point I ended up doing a full length dive to keep the ball in the air and they loved that too. Soon after, I shouted my name as I was going for a high ball, which made everyone laugh, and then for the next couple of minutes they were all chanting my name!

We won the first match easily, but came unstuck in the second. This led to some more ill-feeling and barbed comments between the players. During our second game we had to stop as a fight broke out on the adjacent football pitch. Everyone was having a great time. 

For me, worse than losing in both sports was that I’d actually got pretty sunburnt by this point, so I was grateful when we went inside for lunch. The food was good and the beer was flowing. 

After lunch it was all about the dancing. Again, every office entered a team and they performed one after another. The outfits were all very colourful and there had clearly been a lot of effort put into the routines. 

Afterwards we went into Cusco and I got a couple of snaps of the full moon:

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Peru, Week Three

As with last week, this one got better as it went on (lots of pictures below!), but Week Three in Cusco got off to a particularly strange start.

We arrived at the Arariwa office on Monday morning and gathered in the conference room with the other staff for another talk – the topic this week was “identity and self-esteem”. What we didn’t expect was that we would start with 20 minutes of stretching, followed by giving each other massages (shoulders, neck and head). Everyone was a little uncomfortable, so it nice that when the person in charge talked about grabbing your partner’s hair there were a few jokes at my expense. After that, we each stuck paper to our backs and mingled so that everyone could write “anonymous” positive comments about each other (the only one of mine I remember was deportista). 

I went to another Spanish lesson in the afternoon and Maria introduced the imperative verb form (used for giving orders/instructions). The information is coming thick and fast in these lessons and I’m not finding much time in between to study what I’ve learnt. 

On Tuesday morning, we had our much anticipated meeting with the boss, Señor Hugo, in a bid to clarify our role and decide how best we could help. We agreed that from next week we would start working mostly in the afternoons, because this is when the most important and interesting work happens (as opposed to the mornings when it’s just administration and paperwork). It’s a step in the right direction and should be more interesting, but I’m still not really sure how we can contribute. He also gave us a mandate to research different revenue streams – me using my European contacts (!) and Paula using her North American ones… does anyone have any ideas?!

I stayed on in the afternoon to accompany Sankiyo on his visit to the rural community of Andahualyillas. I was ready to leave at 1pm for the 2pm meeting, but for various reasons we set off at 2:30pm and arrived at 4pm. Neither of the two groups were particularly pleased, but Sankiyo handled it well and we collected the loan repayments we had come for. 

My role was limited to counting the money And making change, but I was also more than happy to look after this little guy for the first group leader:

He’s the size of my hand!

After the work was done, Sankiyo had an errand to run at the town’s police station, which meant we didn’t get home until 8pm. I did, however, see this arco iris:

Work was typically quiet on Wednesday morning and I had another Spanish lesson in the afternoon. In the evening, I returned to the Arariwa office to tutor the eight year old daughter of one of my  colleagues. Marcia was extremely polite and keen to learn English, but after 90 minutes I had to call it a night. She had a test the next day, so let’s hope it helped!

On Thursday I arrived in the office early and was immediately asked if I wanted to tag along with Sankiyo and Leidy to their client visits in Huaro and Urcos. The bus ride there was notable for the guy who lectured us about being eating healthily for 45 minutes. I wonder if he sold any of the ginseng products he was peddling. 

Once in Huaro, we made a few planned stops to clients who had outstanding payments, but also bumped into several other clients around town. It was nice to see that Arariwa had such a big presence in the community. 

This was my office for the day

This growling dog stood between us and our client

We also visited a local museum; so what was supposed to be a two-hour trip took more than twice as long. Rather than going back to the office, it was time for lunch, which meant I was done for the day (and the week). 

That evening I was invited to Mila’s house for dinner with Nic and the other volunteers, Paula and Emmanuelle. It was nice to have everyone together and, during the conversation around the dinner table, the possibility of helping on another project arose…

…So that’s exactly what we did on Friday. The five of us met up early and travelled to Chinchero by taxi, bus and then another taxi. We met a local family who we would be helping to build a stove for. The bricks, tiles, mud and tools were waiting for us and there was a local man with the expertise to show us how to do it. It was a very satisfying experience as we got our hands dirty (literally) for the first time in Peru. 

Before

After

The family seemed appreciative of our efforts and we ate potatoes together after we’d finished. Everyone except me went home afterwards, but I decided to use my Boleto Turístico to visit Chinchero’s Parque Arqueológico. On my own and without a guide, I don’t think I got the best out of the ruins, but I did stumble across a lovely walk along an Inca trail:

On Saturday I went along to the early morning football game again. There were quite a few different players this week and the average age was bit lower. We played six-a-side, which was a bit too congested really. Because of my plans for the rest of the day, I volunteered to play in goal for the last hour or so and I managed to snap a picture:

After football I went for my first 10k run of my trip, inspired by my cousin Claire, who was running a marathon the next day (she smashed it by the way, well done Claire!)

I felt pretty tired after that but my Boleto Turístico wasn’t valid after the weekend, so I had to get out and about.  

I started at the Museo Historico Regional, which was quite interesting, particularly in respect of two main figures in Peruvian history, Túpac Amaru II and Garcilaso de la Vega

Painting that depicts the execution of Túpac Amaru in Plaza de Armas, Cusco

I moved on to the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo and realised that I don’t understand/appreciate modern art. My favourite pieces all had a clear subject:I went to Museo de Sitio de Qorikancha, but I was underwhelmed by the small museum containing fragments of artefacts and some skulls. As the sky was starting to darken, I went to the Monumento de Pachacutec:

I left early on Sunday to get to Ollantaytambo and had a nice morning stroll around the ruins. Still inspired by my recent hikes, I followed a path away from the other tourists and climbed up to get a birds eye view of the town. 

I treated myself to a meaty pizza for lunch and then headed up the other side of the valley to Pinkullyuna. 

Afterwards I wanted to go to Moray as the last thing on my ticket, but this is where my lack of planning caught up with me. I took collectivos from Ollantaytambo to Urubamba and then to Maras, but I was still 9km away. While I was contemplating what to do, I was able to get these pictures:

Plaza de Armas in Maras

Because every post needs a dog (apparently)

In the end I negotiated a taxi to take me to Moray and wait 40 minutes to bring me back again; and it worked out well: